Skip to main content

Clean Your Heart in This Ramadan

Cleaning out the closet feels great. You go through all of your stuff, throw away whatever you don’t want, and give away things you don’t need. In the end, you know you are left with more space, a clean area, and peace of mind. Now that Ramadan is here, this is a great time to take account of ourselves and go through a very similar process with our soul. What negative feelings or thoughts hide in the shadows of our hearts? Are we even aware of how this “stuff” spreads toxicity throughout our soul, which then seeps into our relationships? When we rid ourselves of emotional “baggage” we free up space in our hearts to soak in all the positive outcomes of Ramadan.

To begin cleaning your heart in this Ramadan, it is helpful to reflect on the following verse:

“O you who have believed, fear Allah. And let every soul look to what it has put forth for tomorrow – and fear Allah. Indeed, Allah is Acquainted with what you do.” (Surah Al Hashr, 59:18)

It is only when we allow ourselves to truly take account of what is in our hearts that we are able to process what we find. Who are we avoiding? What grudges do we hold? What negative thoughts do we ruminate over? Once we are able to face what lurks within, we can figure out ways to get over them. let us think about how Allah, Exalted is He, prescribes the process of purification.

“Those who spend in the way of Allah both in affluence and hardship, who restrain their anger, and pardon others. Allah loves such good-doers.” (Surah ‘Ale Imran, 3:134)

Why does Allah mention giving money, first in the time of ease, then in the time of difficulty, before addressing two emotional strengths? And even then, why does Allah mention exercising control over anger before excusing others (a higher level of forgiveness)?
Perhaps practicing gratitude in times of prosperity prepares one for the ability to acknowledge blessings, even during times of hardship. What effect does this type of training have on one’s understanding? We may consider the possibility that engaging in a constant state of gratitude develops satisfaction. Additionally, gratitude in the form of donation fosters a sense of compassion – being able to connect with others by connecting with something similar within ourselves. Gratitude, which leads to satisfaction and compassion creates an environment in which anger is less likely to develop, since anger is a reflection of turmoil that exists within the individual. So in a way, satisfaction despite life’s challenges allows one to engage with others from a place of peace within.

We see a very inspiring application of part of this verse in the following exchange between Ali ibn Al-Husain (also known as Zayn Al-Abideen), the great-great-grandson of the Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings be upon him, and his servant. Abdur-Razzaq As-San’ani (d.211 AH) said: A slave-girl of ‘Ali bin Husain was pouring water on him while he was preparing for prayer. Accidentally the jug slipped from her hands and fell on his face causing his face to be injured. He raised his sight towards her in anger. She recited ((Those who restrain anger)). He said to her: ‘I have restrained my anger’. She then recited ((…who pardon people)). He said: ‘I have forgiven you’. She further recited ((…And Allah loves the doers of good)). He said: ‘Go now you are free’.

Imagine that – spending in the way of Allah, is a demonstration of gratitude which promotes satisfaction and compassion. That compassion, in turn, prevents the early sprouting of anger and rage. Keeping anger at bay facilitates the ability to think rationally and process possible reasons why someone may be worthy of your forgiveness. These three qualities of being charitable, controlling anger, and forgiving others put us on the path of ihsan (excellence). And Allah loves those who exhibit ihsan (as mentioned in the verse above, 3:134).
So let’s begin cleaning your soul in this Ramadan. First, take stock of your negative feelings towards aspects of your life and towards others. Sometimes this process makes us feel uncomfortable, so we shut down the introspection and abort it prematurely. Allow yourself to sift through these nagging negative thoughts and try to evaluate them. Are these negative thoughts really worth the mental and spiritual drain? Do others really deserve the old grudge? This exercise alone may already diminish your list of bad feelings.

Next, turn towards the positive, and put it into action – give. Give when you have abundance, and give when you are struggling (remember it doesn’t have to involve money). Next, work on controlling your anger and find ways to prevent it before it takes control of you.

And finally, learn to pardon and forgive others – out of compassion for their circumstances, lack of understanding, or just for the sake of Allah. This entire process is not easy and comes with a great deal of work, yet the results are rewarding on many levels.

May Allah make this spiritual cleansing a successful process of purification in this greatest month of all – Ramadan. Ameen

Comments

  1. What is the ruling on having medication by injection during Ramadan

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

SEX BEFORE MARRIAGE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES.

In the name of Allah, most compassionate and most merciful. “From among the signs of the Hour (end of time) are that religious knowledge will be taken away (by the death of religious scholars), ignorance will prevail, drinking of alcoholic drinks, and there will be a prevalence of Zina.” – Prophet (saw) We begin our topic with these words of our beloved Prophet. How true were his words? We live in a world where all these things are prevalent and unfortunately in our Muslim community as well. Many of our Muslim brothers and sisters are trapped in the evil of Zina and it has become a norm for them, as a result they don’t even consider it haram and unlawful. Allah says in holy Quran: Sūrah al-Isrā’, 17:32: “And do not even approach zina, for it is an outrageous act, and an evil way…’’ We are not going into detail about why Zina is unlawful but in this article, you will find the consequences of this sin. How this affects a life of a person physically, mentally, spiritually and so

MUSLIMS MOURN ALI BANAT - THE MAN ‘GIFTED WITH CANCER’

It’s a sad day for all those who knew Ali Banat, the young man gifted with cancer. Ali Banat was an inspiring Australian Muslim philanthropist whose diagnosis of cancer motivated him to dedicate his life to charity work. “At this point in my life, Alhamdulillah I have been gifted by Allah with cancer throughout my body and I have changed my whole life to helping people,” he said. An Inspiration to Muslim Youth A man of a kind heart was known for his charity work over the past three years. One of his biggest achievements is MATW project, (Muslims Around The World) launched in October 2015 to assist those less fortunate in the poverty-stricken areas of Togo, Africa. He was an inspiration to Muslim youth, dedicating his big fortune to charity work. His organization built mosques and schools for the less fortunate in Africa. May Allah accept it from him! Indeed, to Allah we belong and to Him we shall return. May Allah have mercy on our brother Ali Banat and make it easy

THE MAN WHO INSPIRE MILLIONS OF MUSLIMS EVEN WHEN HE IS PASSED AWAY (ALI BANAT)

Ali Banat is a sydney born who was diagnosed with Cancer and doctors have given him only 7 months to live. Despite his circumstances, he considers this a gift from Allah. Ali Banat, is a young man who, in his own words, was “gifted” with a stage 4 cancer throughout his body. He was given just a few months to live but took this great test as an opportunity to change his life. Upon receiving this news he immediately sold his business, gave up his lavish lifestyle and prized possessions and began a new mission to give up his Dunya and work for his Akhira. Ali has humbly dedicated the remainder of his life to helping those who are far less fortunate than him and in doing so, set up the charity MATW Project (Muslims Around The World) which has already changed the lives of so many. Being diagnosed with cancer is like death sentence for many. But this is not the way Australian Muslim Ali Ali Banat sees it. For him, the sickness is unquestionably a gift from Allah. “At this point in m